Instrumente
Ensemblen
Genren
Komponisten
Performers

Noten

Im Original

Matona mia cara. Orlando di Lasso. A cappella. Secular , Madrigal. Language. Italian. SATB.

Übersetzung

Matona mein lieber. Orlando di Lasso. A-cappella-. Weltliche, Madrigal. Sprache. Italienisch. SATB.

Im Original

The original text is sung by a German soldier who can speak very little Italian. This fact is given very well in the lyrics, which resemble exactly a strong German accent. even in modern Italian. and include some French words which the soldier seems to mistake for Italian – bon, compagnon – and ‘follere’, which means nothing in Italian but closely resembles the vulgar verb fottere. It also may be from Late Latin, the present active infinitive of folleo , to puff out like a bellows. suggesting the soldier wants to sing a song of bragging or puffery. Dictionary reference here. http. www. wordsense. eu. folleo. #Latin. The text has many double meanings, extremely difficult to transpose into other languages. The skill of the author exploits the limited language of the soldier, using simple expressions that help him to achieve an extremely funny monologue. The strong language has led to ‘adjusted’ versions that have replacements for the most offensive words, ficcar. baciar. and urtar. ballar.

Übersetzung

The original text is sung by a German soldier who can speak very little Italian. This fact is given very well in the lyrics, which resemble exactly a strong German accent. even in modern Italian. and include some French words which the soldier seems to mistake for Italian – bon, compagnon – and ‘follere’, which means nothing in Italian but closely resembles the vulgar verb fottere. It also may be from Late Latin, the present active infinitive of folleo , to puff out like a bellows. suggesting the soldier wants to sing a song of bragging or puffery. Dictionary reference here. http. www. wordsense. eu. folleo. #Latin. The text has many double meanings, extremely difficult to transpose into other languages. The skill of the author exploits the limited language of the soldier, using simple expressions that help him to achieve an extremely funny monologue. The strong language has led to ‘adjusted’ versions that have replacements for the most offensive words, ficcar. baciar. and urtar. ballar.