Instrumente
Ensemblen
Genren
Komponisten
Performers

Noten $36.75

Im Original

Pieces for Violoncello & Piano. Gabriel Faure. Cello Solo sheet music.

Übersetzung

Stücke für Violoncello. Gabriel Faure. Violoncello solo Noten.

Im Original

Pieces for Violoncello & Piano composed by Gabriel Faure. 1845-1924. For Cello, Piano. Sheet Music. Published by Edition Peters. PE.P09570. Concluding Remarks. Gabriel Faure. 1845-1924. is one of the most significant French composers of the second half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. His main work consists of piano, vocal and chamber music compositions. Gabriel Faure was trained in Paris, at the Louis Niedermeyer School of Church Music, his teachers being Niedermeyer and Camille Saint-Saens, became choir-master. 1877. and subsequently organist at the Madeleine. 1896-1905. He took charge, in 1896, of a composition class at the Paris Conservatory and was its Director from 1905-1920. Among his pupils were Maurice Ravel, Charles Koechlin, Florent Schmitt, Roger Ducasse and Nadia Boulanger. The foundation of the Societe Nationale de Musique by Saint Saens and Bussine in 1871 encouraged Faure to write chamber music. Together with Saint-Saens, Edouard Lalo and Cesar Franck, he took part in the revival of French chamber music. Faure always showed a predilection for the Violoncello. Apart from the two fine Sonatas, Op. 109 and 117 which he composed towards the end of his life, the special position that he assigned to that instrument in his chamber music compositions mail be seen, for example, in ti-12 adagio of the first Piano Quartet, Op. 15, at the beginning and in the andante of the Piano Trio, Op. 120, and in the finale of the String Quartet, Op. 121. the significant function of the cello however, should also be stressed in connection with his orchestral compositions. This specific feature might be explained by his training as organist and performer of church music. the cello also functions as an organ pedal. , but it is known that the composer bad a particular preference for the basses in his harmony. "Come on, basses. " was one of his frequent utterances. It is therefore not surprising that Faure should have composed various short works in the course of his life which may he regarded as precursors of the two later sonatas of his maturity. The first of these shorter compositions is the famous Eleie, Op. 24. This was probably the work first performed on June 21st, 1880 in Saint-Saens' salon of which Faure wrote to his publisher, Julien Hamelle. "my cello piece had an excellent reception", adding. "it greatly encourages me to make it into a complete sonata". This sonata project explains the wealth of content and the A-B-A-form of the work. but the cello sonata was not completed. The work was first printed in 1883 with a dedication to Jules Loeb, professor of cello at the Paris Conservatory, who gave the first public performance on December 15th, 1883 at the Societe Nationale de Musique. In 1895 Faure made a version with orchestral accompaniment. As soon as it was published, the Elegie was so successful that Hamelle immediately ordered a new work, intended as a virtuoso pendant to the Elegie. Faure set about composing the piece with little enthusiasm. the new work was mentioned in a contract dated September 25th, 1884, but its publication was delayed for a long time since the composer had a quarrel with the publisher concerning the title. It is known that Faure preferred abstract titles without extra-musical connotations. This, however, was of no concern to the publisher, who knew the preference of the public for visual titles. Faure insisted on the plain title Piece for Violoncello, whereas Hamelle for his part proposed Libellules. dragonflies. , a title which was also mentioned in the contract. Fourteen years passed before the composer unwillingly consented to the title Papillon. butterfly. , which he diskliked intensely. He at least succeeded in retaining Piece for Violoncello, Op. 77 as sub-title. This eloquent and light composition also met with wide response among cellists, although its musical interest is somewhat limited. By 1898, the year of its belated publication, it scarcely correspondend in style with Faure's works of this period, which is characterised by works as the 7th Nocturne, Op. 74 and the incidental music of Pelleas et Melisande, Op. 80. The great passionate phrase of the second theme is in fact much closer to the 4th Nocturne, Op. 36. 1884. , composed during the same period. In 1893 Faure was commissioned to write incidental music for Moliere's Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, and for this he composed the Sicilienne for small orchestra, the posthumously published Serenade for voice and, it would seem, a Menuet for small orchestra which remains unpublished. The project, apparently, was not realised, but Faure was clearly pleased with the Sicilienne, since he used it again in 1898 for his incidental music to Maurice Maeterlinck's Pelleas et Melisande on the occasion of the first performance in London, where it introduced the second act. scene by the well. In the same year, it was published separatly in a version for cello and piano by Metzler & Co. in London and, simultaneously, by Hamelle in Paris. It is dedicated to the British cellist William Henry Squire, who recorded it in 1925. As for the orchestral version of this wellknown piece, it was omitted when Faure compiled a symphonic suite from the Pelleas music, which appeared in 1901. but at the express request of the composer it was printed in 1909 and included in the Suite, Op. 80. The Romance in A, Op. 69 should not be confused with the transcription for cello. also in A. of the third Romance sans Paroles, Op. 17. A flat in the original piano version. This Romance, Op. 69 is one of the best of Faure's compositions for cello. It was probably written in 1894, a year in which many of Faure's master works were created. the cycle of the songs La Bonne Chanson, Op. 61, the 6tb Nocturne, Op. 63, the 5tb Barcarolle, Op. 70 and the songs Soir and Prison, Op. 83 were all composed during that year. The Romance in A begins and ends in a Brahmsian chiaroscuro which suddenly flares up und then unfolds in a long and flexible phrase accompanied by surging piano arpeggios. Its exhaustable lyricism has something of the passionate Elan of La Bonne Chanson, Faure performed it for the first time in Geneva on November 14th, 1894, with Adolf Rehberg. The work is dedicated to the cellist Jules Griset, who used to arrange chamber music and oral concerts at his home. Chabrier wrote his Ode to Music for him. The autograph, it may be noted, in inscribed Andante and Op. 63. It was transcribed by Faure into a version for cello and organ which was never published. The last of the short pieces for cello is the Serenade, Op. 98, composed for the young Pablo Casals, who had become acquainted with , Faure as early as 1901, the year of his Paris debut, when he played the P-Mgie with the composer conducting. The Serenade was published in 1908 by Heugel. this composition reveals the unusual care with which Faure composed even the smallest of his works. exceptionally for Faure, it is full of humour and fantasy, with ornaments reminiscent of the harpsichord music of the 18th century. Yet this Serenade is by no means a mere pastiche. it is harmonically daring and at times wilfully abrasive. Beneath the irony, one has a glimpse of the distilled, austere style of the last works, so remote from the romanticism of the Elegie. "The Serenade", Casals wrote to Faure, "ist delightful and every time I play it, it seems new to me in its beauty. " In fact however, Casals does not seem to have played it very often, giving preference to the questionable transcription of the piano song Apres un Reve which he had himself published in 1910. For this reason the Serenade has remained little known, despite perhaps because of, its originality. Translated by Eva Breck and Stuart Thync. Paris, Autumn 1977 Jean-Michel Nectoux. Romance A-Dur op. 69 -fur Violoncello und Klavier-. Piece pour Violoncelle. Papillon. A-Dur op. 77 -fur Violoncello und Klavier-. Sicilienne g-Moll op. 78 -fur Violoncello und Klavier-. Serenade h-Moll op. 98 -fur Violoncello und Klavier-.

Übersetzung

Stücke für Violoncello. 1845-1924. Für Cello, Klavier. Noten. Veröffentlicht von Edition Peters. PE.P09570. Abschließende Bemerkungen. Gabriel Faure. 1845-1924. ist einer der bedeutendsten Komponisten der Französisch die zweite Hälfte des 19. und der Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts. Sein Hauptwerk besteht aus Piano, Vokal-und Kammermusik-Kompositionen. Gabriel Faure wurde in Paris ausgebildet, an der Louis Niedermeyer Kirchenmusikschule, seine Lehrer als Niedermeyer und Camille Saint-Saens, wurde Chorleiter. 1877. und anschließend Organist an der Madeleine. 1896-1905. Er übernahm im Jahr 1896, einer Kompositionsklasse am Pariser Konservatorium und war ihr Direktor 1905-1920. Unter seinen Schülern waren Maurice Ravel, Charles Koechlin, Florent Schmitt, Roger Ducasse und Nadia Boulanger. Die Gründung der Société Nationale de Musique von Saint Saens und Bussine 1871 gefördert Faure, um Kammermusik zu schreiben. Zusammen mit Saint-Saens, Edouard Lalo und Cesar Franck, an der Wiederbelebung der Französisch Kammermusik nahm er. Faure zeigte immer eine Vorliebe für das Violoncello. Abgesehen von den zwei feinen Sonaten, Op. 109 und 117, die er gegen Ende seines Lebens zusammengesetzt ist, die Sonderstellung, die er in seiner Kammermusik-Kompositionen für dieses Instrument zugeordnet mail gesehen werden, zum Beispiel in ti-12 Adagio des ersten Klavierquartett, Op. 15, zu Beginn und im Andante des Klaviertrios, Op. 120 und im Finale des Streichquartetts, Op. 121. die wesentliche Funktion des Cellos sollte jedoch auch im Zusammenhang mit seiner Orchesterkompositionen betont werden,. Diese Besonderheit kann durch seine Ausbildung als Organist und Performer der Kirchenmusik erklärt werden. das Cello funktioniert auch als Orgelpedal. , Aber es ist bekannt, dass der Komponist schlecht eine bestimmte Vorliebe für die Bässe in der Harmonie. "Komm, Bässe. ", War einer seiner häufigen Äußerungen. Es ist daher nicht verwunderlich, dass Faure sollten verschiedene kurze Werke im Laufe seines Lebens, die er als Vorläufer der beiden späteren Sonaten seiner Reife betrachtet kann zusammengesetzt haben. Die erste dieser kürzeren Kompositionen ist die berühmte Eleie, Op. 24. Das war wahrscheinlich der Arbeit zuerst am 21. Juni 1880 in Saint-Saens 'Salon von denen Faure schrieb an seinen Verleger Julien Hamelle durchgeführt. "Mein Cello Stück hatte einen ausgezeichneten Empfang" und fügte hinzu,. "Es ermutigt mich sehr, sie in eine komplette Sonate machen". Diese Sonate Projekt erklärt die Fülle von Inhalten und der ABA-Form des Werkes. aber die Cellosonate wurde nicht abgeschlossen. Die Arbeit wurde zum ersten Mal im Jahre 1883 mit einer Widmung an Jules Loeb, Professor für Violoncello am Pariser Konservatorium, der die erste öffentliche Aufführung am 15. Dezember 1883 an der Societe Nationale de Musique gab gedruckt. Im Jahr 1895 Faure machte eine Version mit Orchesterbegleitung. Sobald es veröffentlicht wurde, war die Elegie so erfolgreich, dass Hamelle bestellt sofort eine neue Arbeit, als Virtuose Pendant zur Elegie bestimmt. Faure gesetzt Komponieren das Stück mit wenig Begeisterung. das neue Werk wurde mit Vertrag vom 25. September 1884 erwähnt, aber seine Veröffentlichung wurde für eine lange Zeit verzögert, da der Komponist hatte einen Streit mit dem Verlag über die Titel. Es ist bekannt, dass Faure bevorzugt abstrakte Titel ohne außermusikalischen Assoziationen. Dies war jedoch nicht von Belang für den Verlag, der die Vorliebe des Publikums für die visuelle Titel wusste. Faure bestand auf der Ebene Titelstück für Violoncello, während Hamelle für seinen Teil vorgeschlagen Libellules. Libellen. , Ein Titel, der auch in dem Vertrag erwähnt. Vierzehn Jahre vor der Komponist weitergegeben widerwillig zugestimmt, um den Titel Papillon. butterfly. , Die er intensiv diskliked. Er zumindest im Haltestück für Violoncello, Op gelungen. 77 Untertitel. Diese eloquent und Lichtkomposition traf auch mit breiten Resonanz bei Cellisten, obwohl seine musikalischen Interessen ist etwas eingeschränkt. 1898, dem Jahr seiner verspäteten Veröffentlichung, ist es kaum dementsprech in der Art mit Faure Werke dieser Periode, die durch Werke wie die 7. Nocturne op. gekennzeichnet ist. 74 und die Bühnenmusik von Pelleas et Melisande, Op. 80. Die große leidenschaftliche Phrase des zweiten Themas ist in der Tat sehr viel näher an der 4. Nocturne, Op. 36. 1884. , Im gleichen Zeitraum zusammen. Im Jahr 1893 wurde Faure beauftragt, die Bühnenmusik zu Molières Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme schreiben, und dafür komponierte er die Sicilienne für kleines Orchester, das posthum veröffentlicht Serenade für Sprach-und, wie es scheint, ein Menuet für kleines Orchester, die unveröffentlicht bleibt. Das Projekt war offenbar nicht realisiert, aber Faure war offenbar zufrieden mit der Sicilienne, denn er verwendet es wieder im Jahr 1898 für seine Bühnenmusik zu Maurice Maeterlinck Pelleas et Melisande anlässlich der Uraufführung in London, wo er den zweiten eingeführt Akt. Szene durch die gut. Im gleichen Jahr wurde sie separat in einer Version für Cello und Klavier von Metzler veröffentlicht. Es ist dem britischen Cellisten William Henry Squire, der es im Jahre 1925 aufgezeichnet gewidmet. Wie für die Orchesterversion dieses bekannte Stück wurde es versäumt, wenn Faure erstellte eine symphonische Suite aus der Pelleas Musik, die im Jahr 1901 erschienen. aber auf ausdrücklichen Wunsch des Komponisten wurde 1909 gedruckt und in der Suite, Op enthalten. 80. Die Romanze in A, Op. 69 ist nicht mit der Transkription für Cello verwechselt werden. auch in einer. der dritte Romantik sans Paroles, Op. 17. Eine Wohnung in der ursprünglichen Klavierfassung. Dieses Verhältnis, Op. 69 ist eine der besten von Faure Kompositionen für Cello. Es wurde vermutlich im Jahre 1894, einem Jahr, in dem viele von Faure Meisterwerke geschaffen wurden geschrieben. der Zyklus der Lieder La Bonne Chanson, Op. 61, die 6TB Nocturne, Op. 63, 5 TB die Barcarolle, Op. 70 und die Songs Soir und Gefängnis, Op. 83 waren alle in diesem Jahr zusammen. Die Romanze in A beginnt und endet in einem Hell-Dunkel-Brahms, die plötzlich aufflammt und dann entfaltet sich in einer langen und flexiblen Satz begleitet von wogenden Klavier-Arpeggien. Seine unerschöpflichen Lyrik hat etwas von der leidenschaftlichen Elan von La Bonne Chanson, Faure führte es zum ersten Mal in Genf am 14. November 1894 mit Adolf Rehberg. Das Werk ist dem Cellisten Jules Griset, die Kammermusik und Mund Konzerte in seiner Heimat arrangieren verwendet gewidmet. Chabrier schrieb seine Ode an die Musik für ihn. Das Autogramm, kann festgestellt werden, eingeschrieben Andante und Op. 63. Es wurde von Faure in einer Version für Cello und Orgel, die nie veröffentlicht wurde transkribiert. Die letzte der kurzen Stücke für Cello ist die Serenade, Op. 98, für die junge Pablo Casals, der mit bekannt geworden war, zusammengesetzt ist, Faure so früh wie 1901, dem Jahr seines Paris-Debüt, als er spielte die P-Mgie mit dem Komponisten Durchführung. Die Serenade wurde 1908 von Heugel veröffentlicht. Diese Zusammensetzung zeigt die ungewöhnliche Sorgfalt, mit der Faure komponierte sogar das kleinste seiner Werke. außergewöhnlich für Faure, ist es voller Humor und Fantasie, mit Verzierungen erinnern an den Cembalomusik des 18. Jahrhunderts. Doch diese Serenade ist keineswegs eine bloße Persiflage. es ist harmonisch gewagte und manchmal vorsätzlich Schleif. Unter der Ironie, muss man einen Blick auf den destilliert, strengen Stil der letzten Werke, so von der Romantik der Elegie Fern. "Die Serenade", Casals schrieb Faure, "IST-reizvolle und immer, wenn ich es zu spielen, scheint es neu für mich in seiner Schönheit. "In der Tat jedoch nicht Casals nicht scheinen, um es sehr oft gespielt haben, den Vorzug zu geben die fragwürdige Transkription des Piano-Song Apres un Reve, die er sich im Jahre 1910 veröffentlicht. Aus diesem Grund hat die Serenade wenig bekannt, obwohl gerade wegen seiner Originalität blieb,. Übersetzt von Eva Breck und Stuart Thync. Paris, Herbst 1977 Jean-Michel Nectoux. Romanze A-Dur op.. 69 für Violoncello und Klavier-. Stück für Cello. Schmetterling. A-Dur op.. 77 für Violoncello und Klavier-. Sicilienne g-Moll op.. 78-für Violoncello und Klavier-. Serenade h-Moll op.. 98 für Violoncello und Klavier-.